Entrepreneurship & Innovation Courses & Degree Programs


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College of Global Public Health
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Gallatin School of Individualized Study
Graduate School of Arts and Science
NYU Abu Dhabi
Rory Meyers College of Nursing
School of Professional Studies
Shanghai
Steinhardt
Stern School of Business
Tandon School of Engineering
Tisch School of the Arts
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College of Global Public Health
GPH-GU 2342 Global Issues in PHN | Global Issues in Public Health Nutrition (Offered Spring 2022): This course addresses major global nutrition issues that we face today. Food insecurity, and all forms of malnutrition, underweight, obesity and micronutrient deficiencies are leading risk factors of mortality and comorbidity worldwide. The course is developed in the context of the United Nations System, through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda. We will discuss climate change, conflict, and economic downturn as determinants of food insecurity that are worsening non-communicable disease prevalence. Next, we understand malnutrition, its major determinants and its interconnections with the food systems. Students will design a solution for these issues, using the systems approach and principles from social entrepreneurship in the global landscape.
GPH-GU 5296 Public Health Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course helps current and future public health practitioners develop skills to create innovative, sustainable, and scalable solutions that address public health challenges. Student teams explore gaps in the availability, accessibility, acceptability, adequacy, and appropriateness of health-related goods and services in target communities and propose innovations that would narrow those gaps and improve health outcomes. Then, using a stepwise, structured approach, the teams develop and refine a business model for the innovation through stakeholder interviews designed to maximize product-market fit and minimize failure risk.
GPH-GU 5342 Global Issues in Public Health Nutrition (Offered Spring 2022): This course addresses major global nutrition issues that we face today. Food insecurity, and all forms of malnutrition, underweight, obesity and micronutrient deficiencies are leading risk factors of mortality and comorbidity worldwide. The course is developed in the context of the United Nations System, through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda. We will discuss climate change, conflict, and economic downturn as determinants of food insecurity that are worsening non-communicable disease prevalence. Next, we understand malnutrition, its major determinants and its interconnections with the food systems. Students will design a solution for these issues, using the systems approach and principles from social entrepreneurship in the global landscape.
GPH-GU 2296 Public Health Innovation and Entrepreneurship: This course helps current and future public health practitioners develop skills to create innovative, sustainable, and scalable solutions that address public health challenges. Student teams explore gaps in the availability, accessibility, acceptability, adequacy, and appropriateness of health-related goods and services in target communities and propose innovations that would narrow those gaps and improve health outcomes. Then, using a stepwise, structured approach, the teams develop and refine a business model for the innovation.
PADM-GP 4188 The Business and Psychology of Social Entrepreneurship: Roll up your sleeves. This course is about addressing social problems and changing the world by using your signature strengths in the service of others. We will examine the ever-evolving theory and practice of social entrepreneurship around the globe, covering multiple change-making roles required for successful social entrepreneurship, including the visionary, the infrastructure engineer & manager, and the media & arts contributor. To this end, you and a small team of your peers will be invited to collaborate on a social enterprise business plan of your own design. The semester will progress as an informal laboratory where you will be required to use both sides of your brain observing, experimenting with, and helping shape what it means to be a social entrepreneur.
UGPH-GU 80 Public Health Entrepreneurial Ventures: A new GIPH course focused on creating sustainable and scalable Public Health business models, either as stand-alone entities or within a larger corporation. Teams of undergraduate students will explore specific Public Health needs that can be addressed via innovative, entrepreneurial ventures and gain increased business and entrepreneurship skills in a Public Health context.
Courant
Degree Program: MS-CEI: Master's of Science in Computing, Entrepreneurship and Innovation: The new MS program in Computing, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation (MS-CEI) is offered jointly by the Courant Institute and the Stern School of Business. The MS-CEI is designed to train future generations of technology entrepreneurs in the fundamentals of computer science and entrepreneurship.
Gallatin School of Individualized Study
IDSEM-UG 1855 Creativity, Innovation, Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): The course will help students explore images of the self, economic notions of the good life and of society implicit in different ways that CI&E get parsed. Students will examine the anatomy of start-ups as well as intrapreneurship — the fostering of an entrepreneurial internal culture.
IDSEM-UG 2024 (De)Tangling the Business of Black Women's Hair (Offered Spring 2022): For many black women, their understanding of their race, gender, class and identity and notions of beauty are linked to hair. Divided into three sections, this course will first seek to understand the historical, structural, and economic dimensions of black women’s hair. We will cover topics such as labor, the service industry, and how the black beauty salon presents a rare opportunity for black women to become entrepreneurs. We will also discuss the multi-billion dollar industry and economy founded on black women’s hair, from dreadlocks and perms, to weaves and wigs.
PRACT-UG 1301 Practicum in Fashion Business (Offered Spring 2022): The fashion industry’s need to navigate the complex demands of globalization and technology requires a creative approach that connects business, design, innovation and the customer. This course is designed to provide students interested in the fashion industry an understanding between the essential connections of brand development; creativity and innovation; competition and how to effectively navigate; changing customer expectations/needs and evolving spending habits; and cultural movements and customer trends.
REMU-UT 1203 Artists & Audiences in Historical Context (Offered Spring 2022): A follow-up complement to the first year required Creative Entrepreneurs in Historical Context course that focused on trailblazing entrepreneurs and producers, Artists and Audiences, like the name implies, considers the history of 20th and 21st century popular music seen through the lens of iconic performers/recording artists, and their dynamic audiences.
IDSEM-UG 1527 Finance for Social Theorists: Why are some private, profit-making institutions “too big to fail?” Where is the Shadow Banking System? What is Minsky moment? The objective of this course is to provide students with conceptual, interpretive and analytical tools to understand finance. The approach is interdisciplinary and interpretive, drawing upon political theory, economics, psychology, basic statistics and accounting. For example, we use the subprime crisis to explore core concepts associated with credit, banking, business ethics, monetary policy and macro economics. We reference key ideas from familiar texts and also take up contemporary debates in finance. The aim is to help students become more literate and numerate as economic and social agents. Readings include Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (excerpts); John Stuart Mill, Principles of Political Economy (excerpts); Peter Bernstein, Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk and Nassim Taleb, Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in the Markets and in Life, as well as journal articles and pieces from the contemporary financial press. There is also an entrepreneurial team project.
IDSEM-UG 1740 Bridging Culture and Nature: An Introduction to Conservation Science: This course is designed for those who wish to deepen our relationship to nature and then learn how to apply this understanding to the challenging work of conservation biology. The art and science of conservation biology brings together leading practitioners from biology, economics, anthropology, psychology, literature, art, and communications to conserve the diversity of life found on our planet. The fieldwork of the natural sciences is integrated with the applied work of the social sciences, education, business, humanities and arts to provide the tools we need to manage ourselves and create a relationship with nature that is mutually supportive. In this class we will discover how scientists, business leaders, financial institutions, entrepreneurs, social workers, and artists all play an integral role in creating and delivering practical conservation solutions.
IDSEM-UG 1993 The Detroit Cycle: 21st Century Reinvention(s): This course examines the ways in which Detroit has been imagined, represented and parsed in literature, documentary film, political discourse and historical narratives: first as the “Stove Capital” (1850s), as a “Coach and Carriage” center (1890s), as the “Motor City” in the early decades of the 20th century, as the “Arsenal of Democracy” during World War II, as “Motown” in the postwar period, as “The Murder Capital” in the 1970s, and as a “Third World” city on the brink of bankruptcy in the 1980s and 1990s. Today it is touted as “The Renaissance City,” but in what is the present-day optimism rooted? Is it “boosterism” and wishful thinking? Or will Detroit “rise again” through creative experimentation and entrepreneurial innovation?
Graduate School of Arts and Science
ECON-GA 3402 Colloquium On Market Institutions & Eco Procs (Offered Spring 2022): Discussion of current research in the Austrian economics tradition. Themes treated include subjectivism, the market as dynamic process, and entrepreneurship. Ideas are applied to both micro and macro issues. Discusses papers written by students and by faculty from New York University and other universities.
JOUR-GA 1070 Digital Newsroom (Offered Spring 2022): This class will allow graduate students to develop a comprehensive set of skills that will prepare them for a career in video journalism. This is a holistic course that will expand the scope of the newscast and meet the needs of a wide range of students. It will also introduce the idea of entrepreneurial journalism for those students with a video emphasis. Students will be able to develop their reporting and writing skills, achieve fluency with a wide range of newsroom production tools and gain basic understanding of how to produce a newscast and, through a rotation, focus more heavily on field reporting, advanced editing and camera techniques, and live reporting. The class will also encourage media crossover and experimentation.
CSCI-GA 2840 Entrepreneurship Capstone:
ECON-GA 1801 Indust Organization I: Technological innovation, diffusion, research and development, firm behavior, market structure, and entry and exit of firms. Entrepreneurial choice. Schumpeterian competition.
NYU Abu Dhabi
BUSOR-UH 1007 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): Introduction to Entrepreneurship is an introductory course intended to provide students with a foundation in terms of the role played by entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship in the 21st century global economy. The students will get an understanding of what entrepreneurship is, they will develop entrepreneurial skills and eventually write a real-life business plan, which they can further develop after the course. During this course we will focus on the creation of new businesses, the ways that they come into being, and what determines their success. This course is a mix of theory and practice and also integrates a number of other disciplines such as finance, strategic management, marketing human resource management, economics and psychology.
ECON-UH 2512 FinTech Innovation: Finance, Technology, Regulation: FinTech innovation is the hottest topic in Financial Services and touches all aspects of industry transformation. Digitizing a financial institution or competing with established players requires an interdisciplinary approach. For FinTech entrepreneurs and investors to be capable of creating or evaluating innovative business models that can generate revenues they need to possess knowledge on 3 key areas: Finance (quantitative methods and behavioral finance), Technology (artificial intelligence, blockchain, API) and Regulation (MIFID2, PSD2, GRDP). In this course we will cover these key three areas and study their implications for FinTech founders and investors, established financial institutions and regulators.
LAW-UH 2120J Law in Entrepreneurship: Formerly LAW-AD 224J) Law in Entrepreneurship seeks to prepare students for the interconnectedness of global startup organizations and the internal and external legal environments. The course will provide an introduction to entrepreneurial strategy with a focus on law as a basic framework. The course will provide students with the fundamental and practical knowledge of legal competitiveness for enterprises and will introduce students to a broad range of legal issues encountered by founders and business executives and will also help students develop a set of analytical perspectives for making judgments when such issues arise. Students will act in the roles of key decision-makers or their advisors and solve problems related to the development of the competitive advantage of the enterprise in a given market. While the chief concern of those who create and manage businesses of any kind is often in the mechanics of the business itself, law is an integral part of running the machine that is an enterprise. It is law that sets certain standards for the setting in which a business operates and provides the framework to codify the business’ own standards. Thus, insight into the law becomes a significant tool in the business leader’s repertoire. It allows you to be mindful of the business’ limits and knowledgeable about in what manner the business can be strengthened. Students will visit Proctor & Gamble, the Abu Dhabi Courts, and meet the Tourism and Promotion Manager from TCA and speaker at the World Economic Forum
SRPP-UH 1617 Sociology of Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurship is the principal source of economic development, technological innovation, and creation of wealth and jobs in market economies. This course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on the recent work by sociologists and sociologically-oriented organizational theorist that investigates central questions in entrepreneurship. Throughout the semester, we will understand various ways in which the social sciences have provided theoretical insights into entrepreneurial behavior in its broader social, institutional, technological and cross-national contexts. Furthermore, we will also understand entrepreneurship from more practical view by utilizing case studies. Additionally, we will explore timely important topics related to entrepreneurship, and identify sources of data / information during the last few classes.
Rory Meyers College of Nursing
NURSE-GN 2135 Midwife Management Practicum IV (Offered Spring 2022): This is the final clinical course of the midwifery program. Students have the challenge and opportunity to integrate knowledge and clinical skills learned separately during the previous basic courses. They do this in a practice setting that encompasses the full scope of midwifery practice. This course also provides the opportunity to assure the acquisition of all core competencies, with emphasis on cultural competence, evidence based practice, and reduction in health disparities in order to achieve beginner midwifery competence by graduation. In addition, professional role development behaviors deriving from leadership and entrepreneurial and change agent knowledge and skills are reinforced or made tangible in planning on practice as a new graduate.
NURSE-GN 3359 STEM Nursing Innovation: This transdisciplinary graduate seminar will focus on human-centered informatics that emphasizes design innovation through team project-based learning and applied research and development activities in health, technology, and education. This course is suitable for advanced graduate students with diverse backgrounds from multiple disciplines. It will leverage research methods and skills at the nexus of Nursing and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), as well as in Education, Design, Entrepreneurship (Lean Launch Pad), to advance evidence based problem solving and decision making in clinical and everyday health care environments (e.g., mhealth, assistive robotics, and smart homes). Research methods will span ethnographic need finding, ideation, rapid iterative design strategy, value centered design, context and affect aware human computer interaction, and design and evaluation of empirical studies, tailored to the specific needs of teams’ project based activities.
NURSE-GN 3360 NYU-X Lab Practicum: Health Technology Education and Innovation: This research laboratory practicum bridges traditional university silos through transdisciplinary collaboration and experiences on a variety of innovative projects in the NYU-X Lab. The NYU-X Lab allows open access to unique education and research opportunities. The student will join a transdisciplinary team and will work on innovative projects in the areas of health, technology, education, engineering, robotics, product design, policy, and entrepreneurship. Laboratory experiences will be guided by ongoing/available NYU-X projects and the unique learning needs, skills and interests of each student, such as programming, coding or assembly involved in projects (electronic fabrication, system integration, etc.)
NURSE-UN 1306 Professional Nursing/Social Change: Principles/Practices of Social Entrepreneurship: The focus of this honors course is to provide highly qualified students with an experiential learning experience to gain the knowledge, leadership skills and attitudes to promote nurses’ contributions to society. The course will use a seminar format to discuss foundational works from the social sciences and nursing to examine the structural and contextual factors that influence social justice, health disparities, and civic engagement in the United States. Students will gain knowledge and skills to develop a business plan and the leadership abilities to improve their effectiveness as agents of social change. Honors scholars will enhance a community partner’s activities by developing a service learning project incorporating the best available evidence. Admission to the honors course is based on a competitive application
School of Professional Studies
DEVE1-GC 2010 Entrepreneurship & Innovation in Re Develop (Offered Spring 2022): The Purpose of this course is to explore in-depth the numerous facets of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation in real estate development projects. This course analyzes the unique financial, legal, political, and organizational issues associated with entrepreneurial real estate development.
INTG1-GC 1060 The C-Suite Perspective: Leadership & Int Mktg (Offered Spring 2022): This course focuses on the role of the C-Suite leadership and how the competing demands of those roles shape the organization. Students explore the differences between leadership and management and gain understanding of relevant C-Suite practices. Throughout the course, students examine the role of vision, mission, values, and organizational culture in guiding the organization. Topics include risk analysis, scenario planning, leadership models, influencing organizational culture, building relationships and networks, critical thinking, investor relations, crisis evaluation/mitigation, stakeholder analysis, negotiation and persuasion, and entrepreneurship.
LRMS1-UC 585 International Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): International Business is no longer the (almost) exclusive domain of large multinational corporations. Increasingly, small 'start-up' firms are having a significant impact on cross-border commerce. Reflecting this development, this course has two main goals. The first is to help students understand the particular challenges of entrepreneurial action in international context. The second is to provide an educational vehicle for developing a draft international business plan for future use in seeking venture capital and other support.
MASY1-GC 1220 Financial Management (Offered Spring 2022): This course covers current financial and managerial accounting methods and their function within the information system of decision making. Topics include accounting theory and concepts, financial statement analysis as well as financial analysis for evaluation and decision-making. The course also focuses on capital investment analysis, financial models, and the legal ramifications of technological advances in the finance industry. Students learn to apply financial management principles, techniques, and best practices to analyze a firm’s finances. The course prepares students to study financial risk management and entrepreneurship.
MASY1-GC 4200 Innovation & Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course teaches students how to develop a structured business plan using entrepreneurial best-practices to integrate their innovative concept and capitalize on their opportunity.
MSEM1-GC 1035 Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development (Offered Spring 2022): This course will examine the challenges and opportunities associated with starting a new event business venture. Emphasis will be on planning and developing an event business as either a private or not-for-profit venture. Topics include fundamentals of entrepreneurship, business planning and development strategies, tax policies, legal forms of ownership, sales techniques and marketing strategies. Case studies will be used throughout the semester. The final class project will be the development of an entrepreneurial business plan.
REAL1-GC 3410 Entrepreneurship & Innovation in Re & Dev (Offered Spring 2022): This course explores numerous facets of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation in real estate development projects. Specifically, this course analyzes the unique financial, legal, political, and organizational issues associated with entrepreneurial real estate development.
TCHT1-UC 1050 Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course will examine the challenges and opportunities associated with starting a new hospitality or tourism business venture. Emphasis will be on planning and developing a hospitality or tourism business as either a private or non-for-profit venture.
TCHT1-UC 1602 Business Development III (Offered Spring 2022): An analysis of the challenges faced and skills necessary in running a small organization or making changes within a large one from the perspectives of marketing, finance, law, and human resources. Topics covered included: the principles and procedures for starting a business, changing corporate structures, franchising, media strategies, making businesses successful over the long term, making effective changes in organizations, leading an organization, and the dimensions of entrepreneurial behavior.
TCSM1-UC 1050 Entrepreneurship in Sports (Offered Spring 2022): Students develop an idea for a sports business and then determine whether or not the idea is feasible. Special emphasis is placed on discovering and evaluating opportunities, developing appropriate business concepts; determining and acquiring needed resources, and managing the start-up and growth phases of new business creation.
DGCM1-UC 2220 Digital Media Management: This course provides a systematic introduction to digital media management by focusing on the competitive strategy and operational aspects of media industries. The course prepares students for leadership and management positions as well as entrepreneurial activities in interactive and digital communications. Specific attention is given to the creation and maintenance of competitive advantage, media segmentation, and the management of innovation. Principles are applied to practice through the use of real-world case studies.
GLOB1-GC 2292 Entrepreneurship in a Globalized World: This course helps in converting problems into opportunities through a process that helps one hone their strategy and execution. This class will empower students with the key process of global innovation and how to turn ideas into sustainable businesses.
GLOB1-GC 2481 Hacking for Energy: Hacking for Energy is a semester-long graduate-level course designed to provide students a better understanding of some of the key challenges in creating a cleaner, more efficient energy industry. While in the course, students propose and iterate business and technical solutions to real-world challenges being faced by industry and policy stakeholders in the NYS energy economy. Past Industry Hosts have included Bright Power, Con Edison, GE, IBM, Tesla, and more. Students learn from working together in teams (teams are required), and the course represents a unique and important experiential learning opportunity via the Lean Startup methodology to help identify a solution to one of these key problems and assess the viability of that solution. Students learn about the start-up world, and the course provides exposure to potential employers in the energy industry. To be considered for this course, students must apply in teams through a competitive application process managed by the department.
HRCM1-GC 2430 Small Business Coaching: This course is designed for individuals who are interested in establishing and growing a small business as a professional coach. This course will cover how to build, maintain and sustain a thriving coaching practice. Students will be presented with and develop ideas, strategies and techniques focusing on best practices for small business development. It will focus on how to build and maintain their own coaching business by exploring the following: business models, income streams, financing strategies, accounts payables, cash flow, investing in your business, developing new billable services and products, pricing and marketing/sales strategies and techniques, and social media presence
MEST1-UC 6012 Social Media: Social media is calling into question traditional media models and providing new ways to facilitate meaningful exchanges and value creation in both the commercial and public spheres. It requires new ways to conceptualize communication flows and strategies and to understand how they influence cultures, economies, and society as a whole. Social media also requires new skills t conduct successful commercial and grassroots operations and campaigns. This course introduces the student to new developments in social media technologies and techniques; discusses the key communication and economic attributes that power this medium; helps them understand how social media can be used as part of an organization’s communications strategy; identifies key skill sets and knowledge students can acquire for entrepreneurial innovation and employment in this area, and lastly; exposes them to some of the legal, privacy, and other unfolding social concerns that accompany this dynamic new medium.
MSEM1-GC 2015 Managing Your Event Business: The event industry is abound with small businesses and entrepreneurial activity. This class deepens your understanding of managing your own event business, after you have completed the Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development class. Topics include: finding your niche, financing your start-up, building customer relationships, governmental regulation and taxation, promotional planning, and managing growth.
PUBB1-GC 3561 Publishing Start-Ups: Strategies for Success: The expansion of digital distribution has opened many new doors for publishing entrepreneurs interested in creating start-up media businesses. What does it take to create a potentially successful start-up? What is the ideation and review process, the value proposition, and the marketplace? What publishing start-ups have worked, and which failed—and why? In this course, we will take a close look at companies such as Pottermore, Scribd, Oyster, BookRiot, BookBub and Epic. While the primary focus will be on book startups, we will also look at magazine media and social media/technology start-ups. We will hear from entrepreneurs in the field, as well as venture capitalists who take chances on these companies. What are they looking for? What are the variables that matter? This course will be a road map to start-ups and a valuable introduction to the concepts discussed in the Capstone course.
TCHT1-UC 1600 Business Development I: An examination of business management principles (planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling) and organizational structures (single proprietorship, partnership, limited liability corporation, C corporation, and S corporation) from human, legal and financial perspectives. Topics covered include: life cycles of businesses, financial and risk analysis for businesses, legal issues in business operations, premises liability, franchising arrangements, analysis of physical assets, industry practices, managerial strategies, and current governmental regulations.
TCSM1-UC 1602 Business Development: An analysis of the challenges faced and skills necessary in running a small organization or making changes within a large one from the perspectives of marketing, finance, law, and human resources. Topics covered included: the principles and procedures for starting a business, changing corporate structures, franchising, media strategies, making businesses successful over the long term, making effective changes in organizations, leading an organization, the dimensions of entrepreneurial behavior.
Shanghai
BUSF-SHU 206 Investing and Financing in and with China (Offered Spring 2022): What does it take to be successful in China? How do domestic and foreign businesses do in the world's most dynamic economy? How do Chinese entrepreneurs work in a dynamic country? How do investors think about cross border investing into and out of China? How do investors think about cross border investing into and out of China? What are the leading opportunities in Chinese markets today?
BUSF-SHU 311 New Venture Strategy (Offered Spring 2022): This course intends to inspire students to re-conceptualize the essence of strategy from the entrepreneurial perspective. Students will be introduced to a new set of decision-making framework and tools for optimizing the most critical strategic choices faced by entrepreneurs. Based on these framework and tools, students will learn how to analyze the strategic positioning of various businesses in the world history of entrepreneurship, from Estee Lauder’s cosmetic empire during the 2 nd World War to Jack Ma’s smart business in the digital era.
BUSF-SHU 361 Entrepreneurial Finance (Offered Spring 2022): This course seeks to provide an understanding of the financial and transactional skills that are required to fund new businesses and mature firms. The course will integrate both an academic and practitioner view of the challenges facing entrepreneurs and investors involved in business start-up, venture capital, and private equity investment activities. Prereq: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies BUSF Finance elective; BUSM Non-Marketing elective; IMB Business elective.
BUSF-SHU 366 Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech (Offered Spring 2022): In this class, we will focus on the key technologies in the fintech landscape. Starting from the mid 1970's, we will cover major innovations such as the introduction of options markets, index funds, and securitizations. We will then discuss new advances in fintech including digital asset management, lending platforms, and blockchain. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding why some innovations take off, while others languish. Prereq: Foundations of Finance Fulfillment: This course satisfies BUSF Finance elective; BUSM Non-Marketing elective; IMB Business elective.
IMBX-SHU 232 Entrepreneurship Explored (Offered Spring 2022): The main aim of this course is to probe into the core rationale behind entrepreneurship: taking initiatives to make changes. Lecturing only accounts for less than one-third of the course, and students are expected to exhibit a high level of self-motivation to critically examine established and emerging ideas that have been shaping and transforming the concept and practices of entrepreneurship, as exemplified in specific cases and current practices. Students will thus be prompted to think critically and creatively about how to respond to the complexities of changes.
IMBX-SHU 241 Creative Learning Design (Offered Spring 2022): This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today's youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people's near ubiquitous love of the arts to facilitate creative learning?’ In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology.
BUSF-SHU 232 Entrepreneurship Explored: An entrepreneur is someone who is always on the lookout for problems that can be turned into opportunities and finds creative ways to leverage limited resources to reach their goals. In this course, students will explore fundamental concepts, theories, and frameworks of entrepreneurship. Through cases, articles, guest entrepreneurs and team challenges, students will gain expertise in how to identify and evaluate opportunities; interpret, analyze, and build financial models; live life as an entrepreneurial leader; and create a new product or service. This course is not just for students who want to be entrepreneurs. Anyone who wants to create and sustain positive change should enroll. Prerequisite: None
Steinhardt
EDCT-GE 2116 EdTech Entrepreneurship and Internship (Offered Spring 2022): This course is an introduction to entrepreneurship in education where students learn how to critically evaluate ideas, companies, and markets related to educational technology, especially in relation to some of the key problems and challenges of educating all people to their fullest potential. Students hear from guest experts, explore in-depth case studies, and do field work with companies in the NYU Edtech Accelerator.
EDST-UE 1503 Education and Social Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): Innovative solutions in education are emerging from the private sector every day. Business ventures from Teach for America to Khan Academy are changing the way teachers are prepared, the way students learn, and the way institutions use data. These ideas are started by “social entrepreneurs,” people who try to improve lives through solutions that have a market and customers. Students in this course learn about social entrepreneurship, how to identify critical issues in the education-related space, and how to develop their own entrepreneurial solutions accordingly.
FOOD-GE 2006 Entrepreneurship in Food Management (Offered Spring 2022): Development of new concepts in food business operations through planning, organization, implementation, and evaluation of independent and multiunit operations: concept development, initiation, financing, site selection, franchising and analysis and control of risk.
MPAMB-GE 2105 Concert Management (Offered Spring 2022): Course emphasizes concert promotion & facilities management. Content to include large venues & club outlets, box office & crowd management, labor relations, production techniques (i.e. sets, lights, sound, costumes, etc.), special events, tour planning & coordination, contracts & riders. Case histories to display investment capital pursuits, administration/staffing, market identification, objectives, sequencing & strategies, budgeting, & break-even from an entrepreneurial perspective.
MPAMB-UE 1400 Entrepreneurship for The Music Industry (Offered Spring 2022): Students will acquire a basic framework for understanding the discipline of entrepreneurship & how to apply it to the music industry. The course is organized around the creation, assessment, growth development, & operation of new & emerging ventures in the for-profit music environments. Key concepts will be explored using the case methods.
MPAPE-GE 2189 Performance Practices/Entrepreneurship in 20th-21st Century Piano (Offered Spring 2022): A seminar/master class format will provide the context for the exploration of contemporary performance practices, interpretative strategies, extended techniques & the incorporation of multimedia in 20th & 21st century piano music. In-class performances & critiques will facilitate discussion of related aesthetic issues, programming strategies & the entrepreneurial & administrative skills relating to audience development.
FOOD-GE 2106 Social Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Food Business: This course introduces students to the concepts, frameworks & models to systematically build successful, socially-conscious businesses that are both sustainable & public health-driven. The course will also provide access to domain-specific resources including key industry participants, industry experts & research partners.
MPAMB-GE 2205 Entrepreneurship for The Music Industry: Introduction to the discipline of entrepreneurship & how it applies to the for-profit music industry. Explores the creation, assessment, growth management, *& operation of new & emerging ventures as well as opportunities for entrepreneurial models in existing organizations.
MPAMB-UE 1306 Interactive, Internet, and Mobile Music: A survey of contemporary theoretical, technological, and socio-economic structures that link music and participatory/interactive media and entertainment forms. 'Interactive' models in the new music industry include social networks, music search and recommendation engines, personalized Internet radio and streaming, mobile music, live entertainment, and the use of music in video games and smartphone applications. These are examined and contextualized with a view to identifying business opportunities for musical entrepreneurs, creators, fans and facilitators.
MPATC-GE 2472 Music Lit of the 20th Cent: Sound, Music, Tech (1900-Present): This course tells the stories of composers, inventors, & entrepreneurs who opened music up to electronic instruments, new sounds, & new ideas of composition between 1900 & the beginning of the 21st century. Specific instruments will be examined, including the Theremin, RCA Synthesizer, Moog synthesizer, Buchla synthesizer, Synclavier, & Kyma. Specific compositions will be discussed. This course will define a starting point for ongoing innovation in sound design, composition, & the creation of new musical instruments.
Stern School of Business
BSPA-GB 2304: Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development (Offered Spring 2022): The purpose of this course is to provide students with the essential conceptual frameworks and tools for creating successful social entrepreneurial ventures, initiatives, programs or partnerships that seek to tackle global poverty and collective action problems. It will cover a broad range of cutting-edge social enterprise and social entrepreneurship strategies from the global "North" and the "South" with a special focus on Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.
BSPA-GB 2314 Business Law (Offered Spring 2022): The objective of this course is to help develop an ability to recognize and understand legal issues in business. This course focuses on the body of law governing the types of issues that students can expect to encounter in their roles as managers of public and private companies consultants and entrepreneurs. Topics for discussion include but are not limited to contract and cyber laws; the various forms of business structures.partnerships corporations and limited liability companies business torts; product liability; and specific issues regarding entrepreneurs and employment law.
BSPA-UB 2000 SIV: Social Entrepreneurship in Ghana (Offered Spring 2022): SIV Ghana is a one-of-a-kind course that combines in-class learning with a hands-on social entrepreneurship and cultural experience. Over the past seven years, SIV Ghana has been working with its partner village, Woatze Tsatoe, in the Eastern Volta region of Ghana, to help start community-owned social enterprises. When we began work, the village had no concrete structures, paved roads or any businesses. Since then, our class has assisted in establishing several community owned businesses, including the Amenuveve Batik Center, the Tsatoe Vegetable farm, a clean water business and an emerging business focused on women’s health.
BSPA-UB 41 Social Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): In this course students will have the opportunity to find and test new ideas and solutions to social problems, create sustainable business models (using lean startup principles), identify funding options and alternatives, learn how to measure social impact as well as scale/grow a social enterprise to name a few.
BSPA-UB 50 Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Protein (Offered Spring 2022): This undergraduate course -- the first of its kind -- explores business opportunities in sustainable protein. Numerous industry analysts identified alternative proteins and ‘flexitarian’ diets as major food trends in 2017 and 2018. The Economist dubbed 2019 “The Year of the Vegan. An estimated 30% of millennials eat meat alternatives each day and 50% consume meat alternatives several times per week.
BSPA-UB 70 Social Innovation Practicum (Offered Spring 2022): This course is designed to help students gain actionable insights into the nexus between economic and social value creation. Specifically, the purpose is to provide students with hands-on exposure to the entrepreneurial pursuit of social impact and innovation. As a result of this course, students will gain: • Increased ability to recognize and critically assess various forms of social enterprise strategies as tools of economic development and social transformation • Greater understanding of the challenges of growing and sustaining a social enterprise, as well as special insights into enterprise development and growth • Improved consulting skills, including project planning, issue and stakeholder analysis, formulation of strategic and tactical recommendations, and client relationship management.
Endless Frontier Labs MBA Class: The Endless Frontier Labs class is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to learn about the selection, management and financing of massively scalable startups through a series of interactions with early-stage science and technology companies and their potential investors. This course is suitable for students pursuing careers in entrepreneurship, innovation, strategy, entrepreneurial finance, venture capital and new product development.
FINC-GB 3173 Venture Capital Financing (Offered Spring 2022): This course provides institutional background and details necessary to deal with the venture capital and new issues markets Examines basic valuation issues appropriate capital structure the value of liquidity and the value of control Also considers the intangible aspects of entrepreneurship and venture capital forms of financing.
FINC-GB 3361 Entrepreneurial Finance (Offered Spring 2022): This course identifies and follows the wealth creation cycle that begins with company startups passes through successive stages of various kinds of private equity financing and ends with the harvesting of the created wealth through a sale or merger or initial public offering. Emphasis is placed on how entrepreneurial firms adapt financing and financial contracts to the information asymmetry problems the high degree of uncertainty and the conflicts of interest associated with startups.
FINC-GB 3362 Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech (Offered Spring 2022):
FINC-UB 62 Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech (Offered Spring 2022): This course examines the lifecycle of high-growth new ventures (i.e. startups), with a focus on how they are funded. We will follow a successful startup’s path from founding through the stages of new venture finance. These include developing a business plan and its financials, the core skills of valuation, the venture capital industry, and how entrepreneurs and investors realize returns. Through examples of specific companies and technologies, we will also learn about the emerging landscape of financial technology (fintech) startups. We will consider the following subsectors, where startups are either seeking to displace incumbents or sell them their services: personal finance, blockchain, equity crowdfunding, lending (peer-to-peer and AI-augmented), payments, insurance, institutional investment, and money transfer.
INTA-GB 2380 Foundations of Fintech (Offered Spring 2022): “FinTech” refers to financial sector innovations involving technology-enabled business models that can facilitate disintermediation, revolutionize how existing firms create and deliver products and services, address privacy, regulatory and law-enforcement challenges, provide new gateways for entrepreneurship, and seed opportunities for inclusive growth. FinTech is also the label for increasingly technological approaches to the main financial intermediation functions: payments, capital raising, remittances, managing uncertainty and risk, market price discovery, and mediating information asymmetry and incentives.
MGMT-GB 2308 Venture Building for Entrepreneurs and Intrapreneurs (Offered Spring 2022): The future is fast, complex and in flux. Markets are being reshaped at an unprecedented pace, creating a world where disruption is common-place and innovation is not only expected but increasingly necessary. Every player is entering the race to win with the next big bet - entrepreneurs working at start-ups and venture studios, and intrapreneurs, working within corporations, all vying for a piece of the rapidly changing market. Building new ventures, as an entrepreneur or intrapreneur, has become a coveted skill.
MGMT-GB 2353 Managing Change (Offered Spring 2022): Contemporary business environments contain challenges that demand an increasing pace, volume, and complexity of organizational changes. Most organizations, whether they are entrepreneurial start-ups or long-established Fortune 500 firms, find that they must change or wither. This course is geared toward deepening students' understanding of the challenges, techniques, and burdens associated with initiating and implementing major change in an organization. The objective is to prepare managers, or their consultants and advisers, to meet the challenges of organizational change successfully. As such, the course is especially useful for students who plan careers in management consulting, general management (whether in line or staff positions), and entrepreneurship or corporate venturing.
MGMT-GB 3333 Business Start-Up Practicum (Offered Spring 2022): This course seeks to provide an understanding of business planning techniques that transform ideas into viable commercial businesses Students will conduct the market organizational operational strategic and financial analyses that are required to produce a venture concept and an actionable business plan Participants will study firms business planning efforts as well as create a business plan during the practicum the course focuses on these principal themes How do entrepreneurs create business concepts and solve challenges, How does one qualify ideas and strategies in order to effectively select a course of action,How are action oriented plans structured in order to capture opportunity and mitigate risks.
MGMT-GB 3335 Foundations of Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course offers a framework for understanding the entrepreneurial process and exposes the student to most problems and issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new ventures. Case study is the principal teaching method supplemented by lectures, a venture planning exercise, and guest speakers. Major objectives are for students to learn how to identify and evaluate market opportunities; develop a venture concept and marketing plan; assess and obtain the required resources; and manage the launch of a new venture.
MGMT-UB 30 Negotiation & Consensus Building (Offered Spring 2022): Effective negotiation and consensus-building skills are essential for success in almost any work life domain—whether your goal is to be an entrepreneur, film producer, business manager, or political leader. In this course, students study how people reach agreement and develop an analytical approach for reaching more effective agreements in organizational settings. The course draws from research in psychology and economics to provide academic content, while making use of role-playing exercises and experiential learning to emphasize key applied lessons.
MGMT-UB 43 NYC Entrepreneurship Lab (Offered Spring 2022): The NYC Entrepreneurship Experience is your chance to learn entrepreneurship by working directly with the founders of early stage startups. In the classroom you will learn the leading approaches to navigating uncertainty—grounded in entrepreneurship theory. Outside of the classroom you will apply these practices by working directly with your classmates on supporting your startup on a strategically important project.
MGMT-UB 85 Patterns of Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course is designed to provide a broad survey of concepts and skills that will benefit aspiring entrepreneurs, as well as students who want to work in a startup, think and behave entrepreneurially within the confines of a more mature organization, or invest in, or consult, to new ventures. Topics covered include: entrepreneurship as a career option; characteristics of successful startups and entrepreneurs; techniques for generating, identifying, and evaluating new venture and franchising opportunities; assembling and managing start-up teams; raising startup capital; protecting intellectual property; and learning how to pitch your new venture idea.
MGMT-UB 9087 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Israel (Offered Spring 2022): The course explores the origins for the emergence of a vibrant technological entrepreneurial ecosystem in Israel. The course adopts five lenses to explain the remarkable burst in Hi-Tech startups in Israel during the last 25 years. These are: 1) The emergence of related and supporting industries often located in designated geographical clusters; 2) Specific strategies, structures, and corporate cultures; 3) The availability of suitable factors of production through Israeli academia, immigration, and the Israeli Defense Forces; 4) Adverse local demand conditions; and 5) the role of the Israeli government in seeding the conditions for the emergence of complementary financial sources, as well as creating supportive tax and intellectual property rights systems. The course will explore recent trends in the development of the Israeli Hi-tech industry and highlight possible constraints for its continued growth. Finally, the course draws wider conclusions as to the required conditions for seeding and nurturing similar technological entrepreneurial ecosystems in other countries around the world.
MKTG-UB 49 Business of Producing (Offered Spring 2022): A specialized EMT course within the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing (as a business profession) a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries, developing a business model, and generating an income stream to repay and provide investors with a profit. Educates the student in the process of feature film and long-form television production from the initial concept of the story, through script development, to completion of the project. Covers the most important steps in the production of an independent film, a studio project, a network TV or cable show, a radio program, a Broadway production, and an advertising television commercial. Explores all the elements a producer must know, understand, and eventually become skilled with through mastery of development, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, sales, contract and union negotiation, regulations, technology, and other relevant core competencies.
MULT-UB 302 Business Simulation (Offered Spring 2022): This course is designed as an introduction to the world of small businesses and entrepreneurship. A key objective is to help students understand the basic concepts applicable to the operations of any small business. This objective will be achieved through BizCafe, a business simulation game that requires teams of students to manage the operations of a local café over multiple time periods during which students make cross-functional business decisions, evaluate the outcomes of these decisions on their business, and then fine-tune their future decisions to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their business. Over the course of the simulation, students will learn business terminology and how to interpret business information as they develop an understanding of the key functional areas of a business. They will also learn to apply business concepts in a dynamic, integrative environment
MULT-UB 39 Entrepreneurship 2.0 (Offered Spring 2022): Entrepreneurship 2.0 studies the process to launch and build a company. The students will form startup teams to brainstorm business ideas, research and test their products, and create a business summary for a live presentation to the class.
MULT-UB 5 Case Analysis (Offered Spring 2022): Case methodology is a critical tool for analysts, managers, and entrepreneurs. This course explores how strategic frameworks are applied to high level business problems. Case interviews and case competitions are used as models for learning. Students study the principles behind creating and delivering effective visual slide-based presentations via mock deliveries. Class time focuses on concept lectures and skill-building through individual and group exercises with self-critique. Assignments focus on creating and editing data-based presentations. This course is highly recommended for students who wish to participate in case competitions.
MULT-UB 86 Entrepreneurship & Law in Practice (Offered Spring 2022): The course is designed around two games: the law game and the entrepreneurship game. The entrepreneurship game focuses on the legal and financial issues an entrepreneur considers in starting a business. The law game simulates a civil trial from inception to end.
OPMG-GB 2360 Real Estate Development and Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course will introduce students to the broad aspects of real estate development from an operations perspective. It is directed to students interested in real estate development from the point of view of three classes of investors: * an entrepreneurial investor, looking to buy a coop, condo or small property for individual use or rental * a working general partner of a small group of investors, who will actually manage and-or be responsible for overseeing the property after purchase * a passive outside investor, who may be searching for an investment that is limited in liability to the original investment. In real estate development, operating decisions will determine whether or not a deal will be successful and meet overall financial goals. Although most students will not work full-time in the real estate industry, property investments will arise as opportunities to increase passive income and wealth. Understanding how these deals are created and managed will allow investors to choose deals with the highest probability of success. The real estate topics discussed in the course will include all types of development: residential, hotel, office, retail, land and industrial properties. In addition to case studies, class lectures and discussions, some outstanding entrepreneurial developers will be invited as guest speakers to reinforce the ideas taught in class. The class will include a real estate development project, with group presentations to the class and potential outside investors.
OPMG-UB 60 Real Estate Development and Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course will introduce students to the operating process of real estate development from an entrepreneurial perspective.
BSPA-GB 2306 Social Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Food Business: This course sees the free market as an opportunity to drive change in the food supply chain leading to better public health outcomes and even to serve as a catalyst for policy. As Gary Hirshberg the founder of Stonyfield states we exercise our vote with how we shop This course will make the case that the market for food is still highly inefficient often monopolistic at times and that choice is still limited and hard to fulfill all this against a backdrop where consumer demand for healthier food options is growing dramatically. This is not to suggest that by simply offering healthier food options consumers will choose them. Several recent studies have shown that this does not automatically happen. After all food choices are based on a variety of factors including taste preferences cost effectiveness ease of availability and brand image and messaging. This is where social entrepreneurs can play a pivotal role. Through a mix of passion persistence vision innovation and marketing savvy social entrepreneurs can develop and market desirable products and services that capitalize on this need-gap. They can create new choices serve as economic engines and drive positive public health outcomes all at the same time.
BSPA-GB 3337 Social Problem Based Entrepreneurship: Social Problem-based Entrepreneurship is a course designed to put the idea of teaching social entrepreneurship to its ultimate test—with the objective of incubating a series of social ventures through the course of the semester that have the potential to be viable businesses and positively impact social or environmental outcomes. Once the semester begins, “start-up” teams of four to five students each will be formed. The course will employ the latest techniques from Design Thinking to help teams identify a problem as the basis for the startup, prototype a solution and develop a business model through real customer discovery out on the field. While the problem they are looking to solve may be a national or global one, teams will be encouraged to focus on New York City as their initial market of choice to facilitate fieldwork.
BSPA-UB 44: Sustainable Business & The New Economy: Taught by Jeffrey Hollender, Co-Founder and former CEO of one of the most successful sustainable brands - Seventh Generation - explores the future of sustainability and sustainable business, the role business plays in concentration of money and power, and how "net-positive" business can contribute to a world of greater justice, equity, and wellbeing.
BSPA-UB 51 Marketing for Impact: Strategies for Sustainable Business: The American corporate landscape is under assault. The average lifespan for a company in the S&P 500 is shorter than ever, approval ratings for corporations are lower than ever, and consumers are increasingly skeptical of advertising and corporate social responsibility messages that attempt to divert attention from unethical business practices.
Degree Program: Andre Koo Tech MBA: Designed for students with a passion for technology, the Andre Koo Tech MBA gives the tools of business to those pursuing careers in the industry. A specialized core and elective courses complement built-in immersive opportunities.
Degree Program: MS-CEI: Master's of Science in Computing, Entrepreneurship and Innovation: The new MS program in Computing, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation (MS-CEI) is offered jointly by the Courant Institute and the Stern School of Business. The MS-CEI is designed to train future generations of technology entrepreneurs in the fundamentals of computer science and entrepreneurship.
ECON-GB 2190 Emerging Economies and Globalization: 1950 to the Present: This course compares the emergence and development of four of the world's leading enterprise systems Great Britain Germany Japan and the United States. It examines political cultural and economic similarities and differences of successful wealth-creating societies paying special attention to impacts of government entrepreneurship management and financial institutions. The objectives of the course are to develop an understanding of different enterprise systems and to hone abilities to think comparatively both over time and across national contexts.
ECON-UB 219 Great Entrepreneurs: This course will examine the manifold aspects of great entrepreneurship through the biographies of representative innovators.
FINC-GB 3373 New Venture Financing: This course focuses on financing entrepreneurial companies especially startup and early stage ventures Its overall aim is to understand how entrepreneurs and their financial backers can spot and create value This involves learning about the following topics that trace out the venture capital cycle opportunity recognition how to tell a great opportunity from a mere good idea valuation and evaluation placing a value on the opportunity for funding purposes negotiating funding structuring the financing contract so as to avoid conflict before it arises and optimize performance incentives managing the investment helping the entrepreneur in non-financial matters and safeguarding the investment and exit taking the investee company public in an IPO selling it to management or a trade buyer or closing it down.
FINC-UB 61 Entrepreneurial Finance: This course seeks to provide an understanding of the financial and transactional skills required to fund new businesses and mature firms. The course integrates both an academic and practitioner view of the challenges facing entrepreneurs and investors involved in business start-up, venture capital, and private equity investment activities. The course presents frameworks and techniques needed to evaluate high-risk opportunities and structure appropriate investment transactions.
INFO-GB 2132 High Tech Startups & Products: A Technical Perspective: High-Tech software, whether at a red-hot startup or formidable incumbent, has become the ultimate value-adding force driving much of the modern economy. There’s not an exact science behind successful entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs and product managers. Identifying a genuine market need, building a product to address that need, and finding a business model to tie it all together profitably can’t be automated. That said, launching successful high-tech software as a new startup or product is no Voodoo either. While there’s no process that guarantees success, savvy entrepreneurs employ market-tested best practices to maximize their chances. High-tech software is built by a cross-functional team of software engineers, data scientists and/or user experience designers. Leading this team towards success requires understanding each role, how they solve problems through effective collaboration, and how to structure customers’ desires into the specifications these technologists need to deliver customer-delighting software.
INFO-GB 2345 Tech and the City: Customer-Centric Digital Entrepreneurship: Have you ever wondered what it's like to run a high-tech startup? This course provides students with immersive experiential learning about digital entrepreneurship through the lens of successful early-stage technology companies. Student teams are each embedded for a semester into different New York City-based startups from the investment portfolios of Union Square Ventures and other leading tech-focused venture capital firms. Over the course of this immersion students work with founders and investors to understand business models assess metrics and their connection to growth and funding and lead a customer centric assessment of the company's products.
INFO-UB 70 Digital Innovation & Crowdsourcing: This course explores new ways in which traditional firms as well as start-ups can become more innovative in today’s global economy by tapping into digital platforms and expertise residing outside traditional firm boundaries.
INTA-GB 2122 Disruption, Entrepreneurship & Social Impact: Disruptive technologies have massive impacts on society and create enormous business opportunities, especially for entrepreneurs. This course examines this phenomenon through 5 technologies causing global disruption: AI/Machine Learning & Robotics, Human Genome & Gene Editing, Blockchain & Cryptocurrencies, IoT, Virtual Reality & Augmented Reality, Autonomous Vehicles. We will also examine a cluster of technologies that comprise the Smart Cities phenomenon transforming cities globally to increase sustainability, efficiency and access to services.
INTA-GB 3344 Fashion Law & Business: Fashion law is the emerging business law specialty that provides legal counsel to fashion executives and entrepreneurs as they make strategic decisions and confront problems in design manufacturing distribution and retail. Fashion is not only a global trillion industry as narrowly defined in terms of apparel footwear jewelry and cosmetics but it has also become a driving force in the greater business world as the concept of fashion branding has spread to enhance such other product areas as eyewear, home products, hotels, automobiles and electronics. This course will teach students to develop effective synergies between strategic and legal perspectives in the growth of a fashion company.
MGMT-GB 2321 Commercialization of Frontier Technologies: Developing a solid understanding of frontier technologies that are poised to revolutionize all aspects of human affairs is becoming increasingly important for students seeking to pursue a leadership role in the business world. At the top of the list of such technologies are robotics and mechatronics, which make it possible to design intelligent, reliable, and versatile electromechanical systems such as industrial robots, medical devices, aircraft simulators, automated assembly lines, building control systems, and autonomous vehicles. Students who are interested in taking this course do not need to have a background in robotics or mechatronics. The course is designed to help students familiarize themselves with both the technical aspects of developing mechatronics and robotics inventions and the research and assessment activities that need to be conducted to turn a viable new technology into a marketable product.
MGMT-GB 3356 Design Thinking for Managers: Technological innovation and new product development NPD are critically important to the creation of business opportunities and sustenance of wealth This course offers perspectives and frameworks that seek to understand technological innovation and NPD at different levels of analysis including the firm industry and national levels It addresses issues pertaining to the discovery development and diffusion of technological advances For example we attempt to understand the innovation process in both startup and established firms and when established firms have an easier or more difficult time bringing a new product to market and appropriating profits from it We also provide frameworks for assessing new technological and business opportunities.
MGMT-UB 21 Managerial Skills: Increasing self-awareness and openness to feedback are important first steps in leading today’s business for tomorrow’s results. Many companies bestow a management title on key talent and expect appropriate behavior to follow, but that is not the most effective way to develop future business leaders. In this course you will focus primarily on the practical aspects of managing. While based on solid research, the course stresses a hands-on approach to improving students’ management skills. Each session focuses on developing (1) personal skills: self-awareness, managing stress, solving problems, and creativity; (2) interpersonal skills: coaching, counseling, supportive communication, gaining power and influence, motivating self and others, and managing conflict; and (3) group skills: empowering, delegating, and building effective teams.
MGMT-UB 8 Managing Innovation: The course addresses questions like: How is design thinking impacting our understanding of strategy and organization design? What roles do the project, middle and senior management play in the innovation process? How do you decide which ideas are worth pursuing? How do firms choose among multiple attractive innovation projects? What are the best ways to protect a firm’s intellectual property?
MKTG-GB 2116 The Business of Producing: Entrepreneurship in Entertainment & Media: The course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries. Covers the process of feature production from the initial concept of the story, through script development, to completion of the project. All the facets of the production process are explored, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, contract and union negotiating, regulation, and technology. Guest speakers include producers on independent movies, network TV, cable, syndicated TV, radio, and TV commercials.
MKTG-GB 2128 Consultative Selling: The goal of Consultative Selling is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that entrepreneurs - and nearly all other business executives - need to win customers and grow their business. We will use the consultative selling model to understand the process of selling discovery of and alignment with customer's needs, presentations of solutions, overcoming objections, and gaining agreement. Rather than pigeonholing selling as "something done by those sales types," we look at it as providing solutions to customer's problems. Selling is unique in that everyone does it. In business, we sell our products, proposals, IPOs, projects, budgets, and anything else that someone else has to approve. In life we buy cars and houses (buying and selling are two sides of the same coin), interview for jobs, propose marriage, and many other things that someone else has to say OK to. In short, selling is a fundamental life skill.
MKTG-GB.2191 30 Tech Product Management: This course is designed to provide you with a framework for understanding product management for technology products within a range of organizations large and small. The course covers tangible tools, techniques, best practices and real world simulation of what a product manager faces in trying to deliver against product, company and user objectives.
MULT-UB 104 Experiential Learning Seminar: Fashion Industry: Creativity & Business: There are many challenges in running a fashion business. Marrying the oftentimes conflicting views and orientations of the creative side of the business with the practical operational realities of making money is one of the largest ones. This course is an Undergraduate Experiential Learning Workshop. It provides students with the opportunity to work on projects with executives, designers, merchandisers, manufacturers and marketers from leading fashion companies and start-up ventures. Both established players and entrepreneurial ventures will be represented, focusing on specific challenges the fashion industry faces in finance, marketing, sales, manufacturing, management and operations.
MULT-UB 151 Executive Practitioner Seminar: The Dynamics of the Fashion Industry: The fashion industry is a unique and highly visible part of the business world. Its economic impact to New York City is significant, employing 173,000 people and generating nearly $10 billion in wages. In addition, the semi-annual Fashion Week, which includes more than 500 fashion shows and attracts approximately 232,000 attendees each year, generates an economic impact of almost $900 million annually. New York City is the global capital of fashion. This course will bring together leading designers, manufacturers and retailers who will present and discuss with students the unique aspects of the fashion business. Both established players and entrepreneurial ventures will be represented, focusing on specific challenges the fashion industry faces in finance, marketing, sales, manufacturing, management and operations.
MULT-UB 301 Getting to Launch: The Lean Startup Lab: This course broadly focuses on venture creation and guides students through the thrilling ride that is the entrepreneurial startup process. Students explore the how-tos of identifying and evaluating opportunities, developing innovative business models, concept testing, gaining early customer feedback, and then rapidly iterating to better address market demand and meet competitor challenges. Emphasis is placed on completing a feasibility analysis that examines will it fly? and on creating a strategic plan for launching, operating, and financing their business, whether a web 2.0, traditional brick and mortar, for-profit, or social impact venture.
MULT-UB 45 The Middle East: Cultures, Markets, and Strategies: MULT-UB 45 The Middle East: Culture, Markets and Strategies, is designed as an introduction to the Middle East, with a special focus on the Arabian Gulf (GCC) countries. It will examine key cultural, economic, political, and social structures in the region, and their implication for business strategies. The trip to Abu Dhabi will be used as a context to examine special topics that are relevant to the region. Some examples of topics that would be covered include sovereign wealth funds, the geopolitics of oil and renewable energy, Islam and Islamic finance, cultural issues, demographic and consumption patterns, and entrepreneurship. The topics will be covered through lectures, discussions, guest lectures, company visits, cultural excursions, and projects.
Tandon School of Engineering
BTE-GY 950X Project in Biotechnology and Entrepreneurship I (Offered Spring 2022): This practical course offers students the opportunity to apply practically their knowledge and skills to analyzing technology, preparing their own business plans or working at an early-stage biotech company. The student can sign up for three projects. | Prerequisite: Adviser’s approval.
BTE-GY 9513 Project in Biotechnology and Entrepreneurship II (Offered Spring 2022): This practical course offers students the opportunity to apply practically their knowledge and skills to analyzing technology, preparing their own business plans or working at an early-stage biotech company. The student can sign up for three projects. | Prerequisite: Adviser’s approval.
Clean Start: Clean Start is an advanced diploma from NYU for people seeking a transition into the cleantech sector.
CP-UY 2013 UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP I (Offered Spring 2022): Work with industry-changing startups at the Data, Urban, and Veterans Future Labs that closely align with your interests and skills. You will join founders and teams in supporting cutting-edge technology shaping the NYC entrepreneurial ecosystem. Earn credit and take another step towards graduation, gaining valuable experience. The Internship program, led by Data Future Lab Managing Director Craig Wilson, gives you an opportunity to earn 3 academic credits.
EG-UY 1001 Engineering and Technology Forum (Offered Spring 2022): In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
MG-GY 7703 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (Offered Spring 2022): This course focuses on entrepreneurship and venture creation as key engines for wealth creation and successful business strategy in the modern, innovation- intensive, high-tech economy. The course deals with key issues such as: (1) assessing attractiveness of opportunities; (2) launching a new venture; (3) nurturing, growing and entrepreneurial venture; (4) obtaining the necessary financial, human and technology resources; (5) managing the transition from a small entrepreneurial firm to a large, sustainable, professionally managed but still entrepreneurial corporation.
MG-GY 8673 Technology Strategy (Offered Spring 2022): This course examines in depth the strategic technological decisions that a general manager faces. From entrepreneurial start-ups to established companies, in dynamic as well as mature environments, a firm must create a conscious process of formulating and implementing a technology strategy to serve its business interests. Such a strategy guides investments in research and development, selection among and timing of alternate technologies, organization and communications, formation of alliances and funding of ventures.
MG-GY 9503 MOT Capstone Project Course (Offered Spring 2022): This course provides an integrative and state-of-the-art intellectual experience for participants at the conclusion of the program. The course is divided into two half semesters. The first half semester enables participants to focus on discerning the overarching trends which are driving innovation in various industry sectors. The class is divided into small groups each of which develops a comprehensive view of a particular industry sector. In the second half of the course, participants focus on the culminating project of the IM program. Participants can choose to do their final projects on fir…[further description not available]
MG-UY 4404 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (Offered Spring 2022): This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures.
DM-GY 6053 Ideation & Prototyping: In this class, the creative process will be investigated in order to generate ideas for art, design, technology, and business endeavors. The course will show how ideation, design research & thinking, and prototyping can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what one ultimately creates. Students will expand their arsenal of design research skills, learn how to think critically about their audience, content, form, and processes, as well as, understand the importance of utilizing more than one research and design strategy.
EG-UY 3003: The PreCapstone Innovation Experience: Pre-Capstone Innovation Experience course is designed for our undergraduate engineering students (eligible sophomores, juniors) in is aimed at preparing them for capstone/senior design projects with the following goals: 1) to provide students with multidisciplinary engineering prototyping tools spanning biological engineering to circuit design; 2) to expose student to customer discovery process and Lean Launchpad methods; 3) to facilitate E-team formation around multidisciplinary groups; and 4) to prepare students for innovative capstone prototypes and understand the process to transform ideas into commercial ventures. The course exposes students to a broad range of multidisciplinary technologies from biological engineering to electrical engineering while providing an entrepreneurial lens leading to innovations. This is open to all undergraduate Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors but is hosted at Tandon. https://forms.gle/YnX69ZHKraLNzCQU6
FIN-UY 3403 Entrepreneurship and Financial Management: This course introduces the finance of entrepreneurship and venture capital. It considers the perspectives of the start-up firm and the venture capitalist and develops a framework for understanding the laws, contracts and issues involved in reaching mutually profitable contracts.
GLOB1-GC 2481 Hacking for Energy: Hacking for Energy is a semester-long graduate-level course designed to provide students a better understanding of some of the key challenges in creating a cleaner, more efficient energy industry. While in the course, students propose and iterate business and technical solutions to real-world challenges being faced by industry and policy stakeholders in the NYS energy economy. Past Industry Hosts have included Bright Power, Con Edison, GE, IBM, Tesla, and more. Students learn from working together in teams (teams are required), and the course represents a unique and important experiential learning opportunity via the Lean Startup methodology to help identify a solution to one of these key problems and assess the viability of that solution. Students learn about the start-up world, and the course provides exposure to potential employers in the energy industry. To be considered for this course, students must apply in teams through a competitive application process managed by the department.
MG-UY 2704 DESIGN THINKING FOR CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING:
MG-UY 4514 Honors Capstone Project in Technology, Innovation and/or Information Management and Entrepreneurship I: In this course, qualified honors students work with a faculty member (and perhaps graduate students) on an advanced topic in technology, innovation and/or information management or entrepreneurship.
MG-UY 4524 Honors Capstone Project in Tech, Innovation and/or Info Mgmt & Entrepreneurship II: In this course, qualified honors students work with a faculty member (and perhaps graduate students) on an advanced topic in technology, innovation and/or information management or entrepreneurship. This effort may be directed toward developing theory, developing case material or developing a business plan and business strategy for a new venture, or another project of this caliber. A Thesis or Honor’s Thesis may compose part of this Honor’s Capstone course. | Prerequisites: senior status, 3.6 GPA or better through the junior year in major.
Tisch School of the Arts
REMU-UT 1170 Women as Entrepreneurs in Popular Music (Offered Spring 2022): In this course, students will engage in a historical and critical examination of the role that women have played, and the skills that have enables them to succeed, as creative and business leaders in popular music.
REMU-UT 1201 Creative Music Entrepreneurs in Historical Context (Offered Spring 2022): This 14-week course introduces students to the history of innovative entrepreneurs and institutions in American recorded music. We study how and why the fiefdoms and empires built by impressive and sometimes controversial icons have transformed the course of popular music.
REMU-UT 1207 Independent Project Management, Product Launching, and Breaking the Artist (Offered Spring 2022): This practicum course is for students to continue the development of projects as well as for live-testing marketing and launch plans and caters equally to aspiring executives, tech and social entrepreneurs, performers, producers, songwriters, and journalists. Utilizing project management techniques, students will be responsible for accomplishing weekly milestones that will move them towards product-market-fit and building an audience. Lessons from Creative Marketing and Incubation & Launch will move student projects from theoretical to applied, with the professor available to reiterate any difficult concepts and provide regular individualized guidance.
REMU-UT 1218 The Business of Music: Incubation & Launch (Offered Spring 2022): This course provides students with essential knowledge, a framework, the inspiration, and courage to translate their ideas involving music into new business opportunities and startup ventures. Through case studies, project work, reading, research, self-reflection, and interactions with guest speakers, students learn and experience entrepreneurship as a way of thinking and acting, and as a process that leads to new venture creation. The principal focus of this class is on the start-up process and the creation of new ventures that produce value.
REMU-UT 1223 Music Contracts & Dealmaking (Offered Spring 2022): The course provides a comprehensive and practical overview of the music contracts that you -- and every artist, musician, songwriter, record producer and other music business professionals -- need to launch and grow an entrepreneurial music venture. Learn proven strategies for navigating conflicts when they arise and how to safeguard your rights and interests in music that you create. Practice and apply newly acquired drafting and negotiation skills to current projects you are working on with personalized instructor and peer feedback.
REMU-UT 1225 Leadership in the Music Industry (Offered Spring 2022): The intention of this course is to expand students’ knowledge about leadership and their leadership skills in preparation for their assumption of music industry leadership roles. It is geared to all students who aspire to lead, whether as musician, performer, critic, fan, influencer, entrepreneur or within an organizational context. This course focuses on the skills and competencies necessary for effective leadership and how they can be developed and applied to the pursuit of students’ personal and professional goals in music.
REMU-UT 1226 Funding Your Music Venture (Offered Spring 2022): How am I going to fund my project? What are the funding sources available to me? What type of funding works best for my music venture idea? These are among the range of challenges that every creative entrepreneur faces when planning the start up of a new music venture. The good news is that there is money out there and there are more opportunities than ever for music entrepreneurs to fund their start up music ventures. Having the ability to find and leverage funding opportunities is a skill that every music entrepreneur must have to succeed. This class proposes to demystify the funding process and provides an overview of the main sources of music business funding: Grants, Investments, Crowdfunding, Friends & Family, and Bootstrapping among others.
REMU-UT 1401 Professional Development: Pitching Your Music Venture (Offered Spring 2022): The Capstone is a Professional Development project that demonstrates the acquisition and application of talent, knowledge and skills students have gained over the course of their education. The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music Capstone is a senior year project that prepares and positions majors for professional opportunities after graduation and the achievement of a Bachelor of Fine Arts. In this course, students will be required to conceptualize and implement a unique, customized entrepreneurial (or intrapreneurial) music venture and then pitch that venture to industry professionals in a live setting.
THEA-UT 678 Producing: Artistic Entrepreneurship (Offered Spring 2022): This course focuses on the necessary steps to successfully found a company, enter work in a festival and produce self-created performance in a professional context. Issues explored include articulating a mission, the options for different producing models, choosing collaborators, developing a strategic plan, basic fund raising, marketing and managing the legal, financial and regulatory issues essential for start up enterprises in a theatrical environment.
FMTV-UT 1201 Music Producer as Creative Entrepreneur:
GFMTV-GT 2245 Master Series: Producing: This course will focus on the changing landscape of “the audience” and our relationship with content as an expression of identity and perspective. The class will examine the shifting demographics of gender and diversity in North America as well as the significance of developed and emerging international and multicultural markets. With an expanded and progressive view of the marketplace, design thinking will be employed to look at new models for storytelling and to study entrepreneurial strategies for reaching wider audiences in the age of exponential technology.
OART-UT 1093 Creative Fundraising: This course will cover both traditional and non-traditional financing and fundraising in the worlds of entertainment and the arts. Although our focus will be on the film world (with an emphasis on feature films), we will take occasional forays into the worlds of television, theatre, and music. We will also look at product financing. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics (as well as the specific routes) to raising funds for artistic endeavors. Many entertainment projects require significant capital before they can be realized.
OART-UT 1241 Music Licensing Lab: Music supervision and music licensing are two of the hottest topics in the music business. This class will introduce you to the creative, financial, legal, and technical sides of music supervision as well as teach you the nuts and bolts of music clearance and licensing. We will look at the many different facets of a music supervisor’s job, and the services they provide for all types of media projects, including film, television, advertising, video games, online/apps, and more. If you aspire to have a career as a music supervisor, licensor, publisher, artist, songwriter, composer, producer, and/or creative entrepreneur, this course is for you.
REMU-UT 1037 Internship/Career Skills for the Music Entrepreneur: All Recorded Music majors are required to complete at least one internship in order to graduate. Recorded Music majors are required to complete 2 points as part of their Business Area requirements. 
REMU-UT 1164 Advanced Workshop for Music Journalists, Writers, and Curators: In this intimate upper-level workshop, students with a demonstrated interest in music writing, journalism and/or curation will have the opportunity to draft, write and rewrite clips (reviews, blog posts, artist profiles, interviews, etc.) and have those clips routinely edited by a professional instructor. The objectives of the class are for students to: improve their own writing via detailed professorial line editing and thematic guidance; to learn how to incorporate negative critique and line edits to produce more robust writing samples; and to professionalize their writing by developing a portfolio of competitive writing samples (or a longer, sustained work) that can be pitched and submitted for publication. The workshop is also relevant for entrepreneurial writers, journalists and curators who are in the process of launching writing-centric business ventures (including, but not limited to: ad-supported blogs, online music hubs, documentary video projects or album box sets with a strong written / liner notes component).
REMU-UT 1202: How the Contemporary Music Business Works: A broad overview and practical analysis of the music industry, covering a broad spectrum of business areas, including streaming, distribution, licensing/synch publishing, live performance, rad io, marketing, copyright and related fields. This course will also explore emerging technologies accelerating rapid changes and the challenges and opportunities students will face when entering the marketplace. Students will examine different music industry roles and career paths, and the knowledge, skills, and experiences they will need to gain a competitive edge. Students will be introduced to the course topics via readings, lectures, interviews and other media-rich content delivered asynchronously in advance which will allow every class to focus on productive discussions and activities related to business concepts. Face-to-face class meetings will be complemented with smaller group breakouts guided by industry professionals serving as professional mentors. There, students will have the opportunity to grapple with, workshop, and apply business concepts and ideas to advance their own music projects.
REMU-UT 1210 Conversations in the Global Music Business: From Crytocurrency to Big Data: With sales of more than 1.3 billion, the German recorded music market is the third largest in the world: it is larger than the UK music market and behind only the USA and Japan. Beyond just numbers, the Berlin music business is unique: it’s home to hundreds of powerful independent and D.I.Y. record labels; it’s historically been ground zero for innovative electronic and dance music; and it’s a burgeoning tech hub for innovative software/hardware companies like Native Instruments, Ableton and Soundcloud. In this colloquium series, students will meet and hear each week from key creative entrepreneurial figures and innovators in the German and European music business.
REMU-UT 1216 The Business of Music: Creativity, Innovation, & Entrepreneurship: This course aims to introduce students to the practical aspects of entrepreneurship in the music industry, the skills and innovative thinking that empower music entrepreneurs, and the processes and strategies that contribute to entrepreneurial success.
REMU-UT 1217 The Business of Music: Creative Marketing Strategies: This course introduces music marketing concepts, principles and approaches that musicians, songwriters, record producers, executives and music companies use to optimize their visibility, analyze, target and sell directly to customers and fans. Traditional and nontraditional marketing approaches for retail, distribution, radio, touring and publicity will be examined with an emphasis placed on online tools and strategies, including website and mobile optimization, smartphone and desktop apps, seo, crowdsourcing, live streaming and crowd funding, and their applications.
REMU-UT 1241 Music Licensing Lab: Music supervision and music licensing are two of the hottest topics in the music business. This class will introduce you to the creative, financial, legal, and technical sides of music supervision as well as teach you the nuts and bolts of music clearance and licensing. We will look at the many different facets of a music supervisor’s job, and the services they provide for all types of media projects, including film, television, advertising, video games, online/apps, and more. If you aspire to have a career as a music supervisor, licensor, publisher, artist, songwriter, composer, producer, and/or creative entrepreneur, this course is for you.
REMU-UT 1261 Artist Management Lab: Artist managers are the central focus of the music business, the dealmakers behind the latest industry developments, and the brokers of power, influence, and revenue streams for not only recording artists, but creative entrepreneurs and technology startups as well. The role of the artist manager is to help creative talent find commercial success. We will study the basics and fundamentals of artist management, and its many different functions.
REMU-UT 1269 The Basics of Entrepreneurship: This introductory course is targeted to all students who have a strong sense of their individual purpose and are motivated to change the world through music. In this course, students learn about social entrepreneurs, how they think, the problems they address, the business tools they leverage and the strategies they employ to create social change.
TCHL-UE 1151 Crafting Creative Curriculum: Space, Time and Classroom: This course is designed for students interested in learning about using creativity, entrepreneurship, and future studies in formal and informal educational settings. Special topics courses both explore technological progress and notions of futurism to better prepare students for a fast-paced world, and offer opportunities for students to create tangible and useful educational material and to exercise their creativity and entrepreneurial muscles in educationally significant ways.
Wagner School of Public Service
EXEC-GP 2413 Strategic Philanthropy (Offered Spring 2022): This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy. Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards. By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.
HPAM-GP 4838 The Making of a Healthcare Entrepreneur (Offered Spring 2022): Sobering fact: 90% of startups fail! Whether you are a founder or working for a founder, you are an innovator and an entrepreneur. The Making of a Healthcare Entrepreneur is the course for current and future health care innovators interested in learning how to exploit gaps and opportunities in the evolving healthcare industry and launch meaningful, valuable companies as measured by customers and investors. It provides innovators with the essential steps needed to take their idea from concept to reality. By using real cases to demonstrate the various paths taken by others, students will not only understand how to start up a company, but they will gain valuable insights into what it takes to succeed with investors, how to build a customer pipeline, and how to avoid pitfalls that can derail a company. The healthcare sector is complex.
MHA-GP 4833 Entrepreneurship for Healthcare Organizations (Offered Spring 2022): This course is for current and future healthcare innovators interested in learning how to exploit gaps and opportunities in the evolving healthcare industry and launch meaningful, valuable companies as measured by customers and investors. It provides innovators with the essential steps needed to take their idea from concept to reality. By using real cases to demonstrate the various paths taken by others, students will not only understand how to start up a company, but they will gain valuable insights into what it takes to succeed with investors, how to build a customer pipeline, and how to avoid pitfalls that can derail a company.
PADM-GP 2310 Understanding Social Enterprise (Offered Spring 2022): This course is designed to help students learn how to launch and scale social enterprises. Using business as a force for good, social entrepreneurs implement innovative private sector approaches to solve social, cultural and/or environmental problems. Surviving start-up and scaling to maximize impact is an art, science and emotional journey, especially when attempted without investors. Statistics show that approximately 4% of small businesses surpass $1 million in revenues, while only 0.4% surpass $10 million. The course begins by exploring methods and motivations of Certified B Corporations and draws upon the real-life successes and challenges faced by social entrepreneurs. Students will complete several activities and projects to simulate the launching and scaling of their own social enterprises and should leave the course empowered with the tools, knowledge and depth of vulnerability involved with building a successful organization.
PADM-GP 2312 Financial Management of the Social Enterprise: Managing Financial & Social Returns (Offered Spring 2022): This course will explore best and evolving practices in the financial management and impact measurement of social enterprises. The class will be taught from the perspective of the social entrepreneur and social enterprise manager and introduce cases to assess financial challenges, fiscal performance and financing strategy of pioneering firms with a social mission. We will explore trends, successes and failures in managing enterprises to achieve both financial and social returns.
PADM-GP 4321 Operating Social Enterprises (Offered Spring 2022): This course will provide a comprehensive overview and step by step approach to the most critical aspects of operating social enterprises. This course will put students in the shoes of the social entrepreneur, social enterprise or operations manager, using detailed examples and activities from a real-world social enterprise, as well as best practices from targeted case studies addressing key course topics. For this semester, the course will feature the Professor’s experience with building and operating a social enterprise in the peanut agricultural value chain in Haiti. Student practice and assignments will be informed by actual datasets and mini-case examples from this social enterprise.
UPADM-GP 267 Social Entrepreneurship Incubator & Practicum (Offered Spring 2022): This course is designed for upper-class undergraduates who have a social innovation project, entrepreneurial business, or CSR idea to develop or implement. Also welcome to the course are students who would like to learn and practice success skills and employment strategies, and are willing to participate in class teams with other students who have project ideas. To bring the dynamic world of social innovation fully into the classroom,
Degree Program: CAP-GP: Capstone: Advanced Lab in Social Innovation I: As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or working on a pre-approved, team-generated project in which they develop a business case or prototype to create social impact or launch a social enterprise.
PADM-GP 2125 Foundations of Nonprofit Management: Examination of the role of the nonprofit sector in contemporary society and the practical concerns of management. Historical, descriptive, and theoretical issues relevant to the sector are explored. Special attention is paid to the changing relationships between public, for-profit, and nonprofit organizations.
PADM-GP 2132 Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation by Design: This course is designed to help students understand and make their own mark in today’s revolution in how to innovate.
PADM-GP 2145 Design Thinking: The word "design" has traditionally been used to describe the visual aesthetics of objects such as books, websites, products, architecture, and fashion. Yet increasingly design as a discipline is expanding to include not just the shaping of artifacts but also the ways people interact with systems, services, and organizations. As the challenges and opportunities facing society grow more complex, and as stakeholders grow more diverse, an approach known as "design thinking" is playing a greater role in finding meaningful paths forward. Design thinking is an iterative problem-solving process of discovery, ideation, and experimentation that employs design-based techniques to gain insight and yield innovative solutions for virtually any type of organizational or business challenge, prominently including those within public service. In "Design Thinking: A Creative Approach to Problem Solving and Creating Impact," we will unpack each step of the design thinking process and become familiar with the design thinker's toolkit. Students will develop skills as ethnographers, visual thinkers, strategists, and storytellers through a hybrid of seminar discussions and collaborative projects. Over the course of seven weeks, students will directly apply what they have learned to public service and social entrepreneurial challenges about which they are passionate: they will untangle the complexities of related policy and explore innovative ways to create real impact.
PADM-GP 2249 Scaling Social Enterprises in the Amazon: In Spring 2021, PADM-GP 2249 Scaling Social Enterprises (3 credits) will be a virtual course abroad in the Amazon. In this course, students will be placed in teams and work online alongside students from local universities to investigate the achievements, challenges, and growth opportunities faced by social enterprises devoted to the food sector in the region. The course culminates with the online students teams authoring a business case on their assigned social enterprise.
PADM-GP 2311 Social Impact Investment: This course provides an introduction to the impact investment landscape, the evolution of impact investment as an asset class and the opportunities and challenges for investors seeking meaningful impact investment vehicles. The course will also teach the process by which an investor performs financial due diligence on a social enterprise to render a responsible investment decision. Students will learn the entire impact investment process from deal sourcing to investment structuring to monitoring financial and social returns.
PADM-GP 2413 Strategic Philanthropy: This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy. Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.
PADM-GP 4315 Advanced Financial and Impact Modeling for Nonprofits and Social Enterprises: Increasingly, as the field of impact investing develops worldwide, leaders in the social field are adopting selected tools from their counterparts in the private sector. One of the most widely used and useful tools is the spreadsheet-based, projection model of an individual enterprise. This course focuses on modeling tools used by nonprofit organizations, social entrepreneurs and other practitioners to develop business strategies and funding approaches, including market-based funding, to scale their work.
UPADM-GP 221 The Meaning of Leadership: The Meaning of Leadership will prepare you to practice effective leadership and teamwork in a variety of contexts—business, politics, community organizing, entrepreneurship, sports, teaching, sales, coaching, etc—without relying on authority, status, hierarchy, or other external conditions. You will learn to create more meaning, value, importance, and purpose in your teammates, work, and professional relationships. As a result, your teams will accomplish more with greater satisfaction. Your teammates will feel inspired and will want to work with you again.
UPADM-GP 265 Fundamentals of Social Entrepreneurship: Problem Solving and Innovation: Using “business as a force for good”, social entrepreneurs implement innovative private sector approaches to solve social, cultural and/or environmental problems. Surviving start-up and scaling to maximize impact is both an art and a science, especially when attempted without outside investments. Statistics show that approximately 10% of small businesses surpass $1 million in revenues, while only 0.5% surpass $10 million. Fundamentals of Social Entrepreneurship will draw upon the real-life successes and challenges faced by the professor and other social entrepreneurs in structuring and scaling their enterprises. Students will read several articles, watch videos and complete group projects to experience the launching and scaling of their own social enterprises.